October 18, 2009

PODCAST: Eric Red

Eric-Red-Famke-Janssen-100-Feet.jpg

1996's Bad Moon was the last film helmed by cult genre filmmaker Eric Red (director of Body Parts and Cohen and Tate, screenwriter of Near Dark and The Hitcher) before most had heard about the strange and tragic troubles he encountered earlier this decade. Premiering last year on the SyFy channel, 100 Feet marks Red's return to the screen:

"Her Husband's Dead, and He's Taking the News Badly" reads the irresistible tagline of Eric Red's first film in 12 years, in which abused wife Marnie (Famke Janssen) learns that stabbing her sadistic spouse three times is not enough to keep him away. After serving some time for murder, she's placed under house arrest in her spacious Brooklyn brownstone, fitted with an electronic anklet, and is soon haunted by hubby's vengeful spirit (a creepy Michael Paré, looking more like Michael Myers). Hand-wringingly tense, 100 Feet provides the chills expected from the writer of the wonderfully deranged Near Dark and The Hitcher.

As part of the Film Society of Lincoln Center's Scary Movies 3 series (now through October 22), both 100 Feet and The Hitcher will screen on Tuesday, October 20th—the same day that 100 Feet lands on DVD. Ominously calling just before midnight on the 13th of this month, I spoke with Eric Red about both films, the unfortunate remake of The Hitcher, how he feels about a notorious review by Roger Ebert, and what scares him today.

To listen to the podcast, click here. (14:58)

Podcast Music
INTRO: Mark Isham, "Headlights (Main Theme to The Hitcher)"
OUTRO: Mark Isham, "Dust and Gasoline"



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Posted by ahillis at October 18, 2009 12:37 PM

Comments

He didn't really get much of an opportunity to talk about 100 Feet :S

Posted by: creejay at October 19, 2009 8:28 AM

100 Feet is pretty good until the overblown finale. I'm always looking forward to Red's new films because he has a great feel for horror.

Posted by: Wostry Ferenc at October 19, 2009 1:05 PM
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